Retail Labor and Employment Law

Retail Labor and Employment Law

News, Updates, and Insights for Retail Employers

New State Legislation Seeks to Curb “Drive By” Lawsuits and Service Animal Fraud

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Service DogDespite the noble purpose for Title III of the ADA, businesses have long been frustrated by the ease in which Title III and its state and local equivalents can be exploited by serial plaintiffs/attorneys looking to make money instead of enforce the law.  Similar feelings arise from the inability of businesses to combat fraud tied to accessibility.   In an effort to address these concerns, recent developments at the state law level are ushering in a welcome change in the way certain accessibility issues are addressed.  California is strengthening its existing limitations on the ability of a plaintiff to file a “drive by” litigation alleging inaccessible structural elements under state law.  Colorado may soon adopt criminal penalties for individuals found to have fraudulently misrepresented an animal as a service dog.  While both of these measures are relatively modest in scope, they reflect a positive trend in legislation to try and limit accessibility litigations to legitimate claims.  Businesses can only hope these initiatives (and ones with even greater scope) gain traction in other states across the country and, ultimately, at the federal level.

California’s New Restrictions on “Drive By” Technical Construction-Related Litigations

Earlier this month, California Governor Jerry Brown signed SB 269, the latest effort by the state to enhance its existing measures curtailing the number of lawsuits brought under the Title III and equivalent state laws (e.g., Unruh Act, Disabled Persons Act) that are currently flooding the dockets of California courts.  While individuals bringing private actions under Title III cannot seek damages, California state law permits a plaintiff to seek actual damages and minimum statutory damages (generally $4,000, with a possibility of a reduction to $2,000 for small businesses in certain circumstances) for each instance of discrimination relating to a construction-related accessibility issue (e.g., non-compliance with California’s Construction-Related Accessibility Standards Compliance Act or the federal 2010 ADA Standards).  Under both federal and state law plaintiffs can recover attorney’s fees and costs.  The unfortunate by-product of this dynamic has been the development of a “cottage industry” whereby an individual with a disability partners with a plaintiff’s firm to repeatedly file multiple (in some instances hundreds of) litigations alleging highly technical instances of structural inaccessibility with the hopes of convincing the defendant (often smaller businesses unaware of these laws or large companies with hundreds of national locations who are unaware of such minor technical issues at a specific location) to quickly settle the matters for a small payment to plaintiff for vaguely defined “damages” plus fees/costs to plaintiff’s counsel.

The new provisions set forth in SB 269 seek to discourage frivolous actions brought predominately to collect fees by creating a rebuttable presumption that for any claims filed after May 10, 2016, a plaintiff has not experienced difficulty, discomfort, or embarrassment for purposes of being awarded minimum statutory damages if the defendant is:

A small business (one that employs 25 or fewer employees on average over the past three years (or since its inception if less than three years) and has annual gross receipts of less than 3.5 million dollars over the past three years (or since its inception if less than three years));

  • The small business has corrected all “technical violations” within 15 days of service or receipt of complaint or written notice; and
  • The technical violation is based on one the following:
    • Interior signs, other than directional signs or signs that identify the location of accessible elements, facilities, or features, when not all such elements, facilities, or features are accessible;
    • The lack of exterior signs, other than parking signs and directional signs, including signs that indicate the location of accessible pathways or entrance and exit doors when not all pathways, entrance and exit doors are accessible;
    • The order in which parking signs are placed or the exact location or wording of parking signs, provided that the parking signs are clearly visible and indicate the location of accessible parking and van-accessible parking;
    • The color of parking signs, provided that the color of the background contrasts with the color of the information on the sign;
    • The color of parking lot striping, provided that it exists and provides sufficient contrast with the surface upon which it is applied to be reasonably visible;
    • Faded, chipped, damaged, or deteriorated paint in otherwise fully compliant parking spaces and passenger access aisles in parking lots, provided that it indicates the required dimensions of a parking space or access aisle in a manner that is reasonably visible; and
    • The presence or condition of detectable warning surfaces on ramps, except where the ramp is part of a pedestrian path of travel that intersects with a vehicular lane or other hazardous area.

In addition, SB 269 exempts defendants from liability for minimum statutory damages with respect to a structural area inspected by a certified access specialist (CASp) for a period of 120 days (unless a limited exception relating to delays in obtaining necessary permits is triggered) if specified conditions are met:

The defendant is a business that, as of the date of inspection, has employed 50 or fewer employees on average over the past three years, or for the years it has been in existence if less than three years;

  • The structure or area of the alleged violation was the subject of an inspection report indicating “CASp determination pending” or “Inspected by a CASp.”;
  • The inspection predates the filing of the claim by, or receipt of a demand letter from, the plaintiff regarding the alleged violation of a construction related accessibility standard, and the defendant was not on notice of the alleged violation prior to the CASp inspection; and
  • The defendant has corrected, within 120 days of the date of the inspection, all construction-related violations in the structure or area inspected by the CASp that are noted in the CASp report that are the basis of the claim.

It is worth noting that this CASp provision can only be utilized once for each structure or area inspected by a CASp unless the inspected structure or area has undergone modifications or alterations that affect the compliance with construction-related accessibility standards or those structures or areas after the date of the last inspection, and the defendant obtains an additional CASp inspection within 30 days of final approval by the DOB or COO, as appropriate, regarding the modifications or alterations.

While unlikely to entirely stem the flow of “drive by” litigations – particularly against larger businesses – these provisions of SB 269 certainly provide new protections for small businesses, particularly those who proactively engage a CASp to inspect their businesses and then promptly work to bring their businesses into compliance in accordance with applicable law.

Colorado May Soon Criminalize Fraudulent Misrepresentation of Service Animals

Another issue that businesses are facing with increased frequency are individuals fraudulently misrepresenting that a pet or emotional support animal is a service animal protected under Title III and/or equivalent state and local laws.  Title III defines a service animal as a dog or miniature horse that is trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability and whose work or task is directly related to the person’s disability.  Businesses seeking to determine if an animal meets this definition and is entitled to the protections under accessibility laws can only ask a patron two questions:  (i) is the dog (or miniature horse) required because of a disability; and (ii) what work or task has the dog (or miniature horse) been trained to perform.  The business cannot demand any sort of certification papers.  Not only can people easily lie when answering these questions, but individuals seeking to bring pets into businesses have taken to purchasing readily available “service animal vests” online to aid in committing fraud.

Recognizing that such fraudulent activities ultimately harm both businesses and individuals with disabilities who truly rely upon assistance from a legitimate service animal, Colorado recently passed legislation that would make it a minor crime to intentionally misrepresent entitlement to the assistance of a service animal.  The penalties would be triggered if:  (i) the animal is not a service animal with regard to the person in question; and/or (ii) the person does not have a disability.  Individuals found in violation of this statute would be subject to a modest monetary fine that escalate with each documented violation.  The bill is currently pending signature.  Once signed it would become effective as of January 1, 2017, unless a referendum petition is filed against the bill and that bill is then defeated in a vote during a November 2016 election.

While modest fines are unlikely to eliminate service animal fraud in Colorado, the proposed bill correctly recognizes a legitimate issue and provides other states (and the federal government) a potential path to follow and build upon in an effort to prevent service animal fraud.

 

 

Employers: DOL Final White Collar Exemption Rule Takes Effect on December 1, 2016

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Our colleagues Jeffrey Ruzal and Michael Kun at Epstein Becker Green have a post on the Wage & Hour Defense Blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the retail industry: “DOL Final White Collar Exemption Rule to Take Effect on December 1, 2016.”

Following is an excerpt:

Nearly a year after the Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to address an increase in the minimum salary for white collar exemptions, the DOL has announced its final rule, to take effect on December 1, 2016. …

According to the DOL’s Fact Sheet, the final rule will also do the following:

  • The total annual compensation requirement for “highly compensated employees” subject to a minimal duties test will increase from the current level of $100,000 to $134,004, which represents the 90th percentile of full-time salaried workers nationally.
  • The salary threshold for the executive, administrative, professional, and highly compensated employee exemptions will automatically update every three years to “ensure that they continue to provide useful and effective tests for exemption.”
  • The salary basis test will be amended to allow employers to use non-discretionary bonuses and incentive payments, such as commissions, to satisfy up to 10 percent of the salary threshold.
  • The final rule does not in any way change the current duties tests. …

With the benefit of more than six months until the final rule takes effect, employers should not delay in auditing their workforces to identify any employees currently treated as exempt who will not meet the new salary threshold. For such persons, employers will need to determine whether to increase workers’ salaries or convert them to non-exempt.

Read the full post here.

OSHA’s Electronic Recordkeeping Rule: New Pitfalls for Employers

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Our colleague Valerie Butera, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the OSHA Law Update blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the retail industry: “OSHA’s New Electronic Recordkeeping Rule Creates a Number of New Pitfalls for Employers.”

Following is an excerpt:

On May 12, 2016, OSHA published significant amendments to its recordkeeping rule, requiring many employers to submit work-related injury and illness information to the agency electronically.  The amendments also include provisions designed to prevent employers from retaliating against employees for reporting injuries and illnesses at work.  The information employers provide will be “scrubbed” of personally identifiable information and published on OSHA’s website in a searchable format. …

OSHA plans to rely upon computer software to remove personally identifiable information from these records.  The software will supposedly remove all of the fields that contain identifiers such as the employee’s name, address, and work title, and to search the narrative field in the form to ensure that no personally identifiable information is contained in it.  OSHA’s reliance on a computer system to detect every piece of identifiable information in a narrative is terribly risky and increases the potential for a data breach.

Read the full post here.

DOJ Refreshes Its Efforts to Promulgate Title II Website Accessibility Regulations and Other Accessible Technology Updates – What Does It All Suggest for Businesses?

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Internet Connectivity and Web Browser - AbstractOn April 28, 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, withdrew its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) titled Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability; Accessibility of Web Information and Services of State and Local Government Entities.  This original initiative, which was commenced at the 20th Anniversary of the ADA in 2010, was expected to result in a final NPRM setting forth website accessibility regulations for state and local government entities later this year.  Instead, citing a need to address the evolution and enhancement of technology (both with respect to web design and assistive technology for individuals with disabilities) and to collect more information on the costs and benefits associated with making websites accessible, DOJ “refreshed” its regulatory process and, instead, on May 9, 2016, published a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM) in the federal register.

By August 8, 2016, the SNPRM seeks comments on a variety of issues, including, among others:

  • The appropriate technical standards for providing an accessible website (e.g., WCAG 2.0?);
  • The time period covered entities should be given for compliance once the regulations are effective (e.g., two years?)  and whether additional time should be granted for any specific requirements (e.g., narrative description?);
  • Whether exemptions should be granted for a variety of reasons (e.g., smaller entities; archived materials; existing pdf/Word documents; third-party content/links);
  • Should alternative formats ever be an acceptable alternative to an accessible website? and
  • Should mobile applications be covered by the regulations?

While this development does not directly impact businesses covered by Title III, it does suggest a few relevant considerations.  The questions posed in the SNPRM indicate that DOJ is considering many of the issues that Title III businesses have been forced to grapple with on their own in the face of the recent wave of website accessibility demand letters and lawsuits commenced on behalf of private plaintiffs and advocacy groups.  It would be a positive development for any eventual government regulations to clearly speak to these issues.  Conversely, it may be even longer before we see final regulations for Title III entities.  DOJ has long indicated its intent to first promulgate Title II regulations and then draw upon them in developing subsequent Title III regulations.  While the final Title II regulations were expected in 2016, the Title III regulations were already not expected until any earlier than 2018.  Therefore, this unexpected development could result in even further delays in the issuance of final Title III regulations (something which could also be impacted by any developments relating to this being an election year) resulting in businesses continuing to have to draw teachings from a variety of indirect/analogous resources when assessing how to best address accessible technology issues.

One Industry Takes Action

In the face of mounting frustration stemming from DOJ’s ongoing delays in promulgating website accessibility regulations while plaintiff’s counsel are allowed to continue to aggressively pursue claims some in the real estate industry recently decided to take action.  Citing “the growing confusion around web site accessibility,” on April 29, 2016, the National Association of Realtors wrote a letter to DOJ’s Civil Rights Division imploring DOJ to take actions to regulate the issue of website accessibility for Title III entities as soon as possible.  The letter highlighted the unfortunate dynamic that currently exists as DOJ and plaintiffs’ counsel seek to enforce broad overarching civil rights provisions in the absence of any uniform federal regulations.  (This is similar to the December 2015 efforts of Senator Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) and a group of eight other Senators who wrote to the Obama administration calling for the prompt release of rules that would clarify and support access to information and communications technology ADA.)

Another Possible Approach to Mobile Accessibility?

While most current settlement agreements regarding website accessibility focus on desktop websites, many businesses are anticipating that the next target for plaintiffs and advocacy groups will be their mobile websites and applications.  Such concern is well founded as recent DOJ settlement agreements addressing accessible technology have included modifications to both desktop websites and mobile applications.

To date, those settlements have referenced the same compliance standard for both desktop and mobile websites and applications; WCAG 2.0 at Levels A and AA.  This is notwithstanding the fact that as currently written WCAG 2.0 does not directly incorporate mobile applications.  While the W3C has stated that a large number of existing WCAG 2.0 techniques can be applied to mobile content, a separate list of mobile-related guidelines is not currently available (though the W3C’s Mobile Accessibility Task Force is working to develop WCAG 2.0 Techniques that directly address emerging mobile accessibility challenges such as small screens, touch and gesture interface, and changing screen orientation for use with the WCAG).   In the interim, the W3C has published a working draft document titled “Mobile Accessibility:  How WCAG 2.0 and Other W3C/WAI Guidelines Apply to Mobile” that is intended to help mobile app developers apply the current WCAG 2.0 requirements to mobile applications.

However, a recent settlement between Netflix Inc. and the American Council of the Blind and Bay State Council of the Blind took a somewhat different approach.  While relying upon WCAG 2.0 Levels A and AA for the desktop website obligations, for mobile applicable devices, the agreement instead referenced the British Broadcasting Corporation’s Mobile Accessibility Standards and Guidelines version 1.0 (the “BBC Mobile Requirements”).

The BBC Mobile Requirements are a set of best practices for mobile web content and applications.  Instead of attempting to apply the desktop website requirements of the WCAG 2.0 to mobile applications, the BBC Mobile Requirements provide mobile application developers with a list of accessibility requirements for 11 topics that are specifically geared to enhance the accessibility of mobile applications.  The BBC Mobile Requirements were developed to:  (i) more accurately reflect the technology used by mobile applications; (ii) provide testing criteria that can be specifically applied to mobile devices; and (iii) provide developers of the two most pervasive mobile application platforms – iOS (Apple) and Android – with specific guidance for providing accessibility where one technique may not be applicable to both platforms.  They are categorized as:  (i) “Standards,” which are identified by the words, “Must” or “Must Not”; and (ii) “Guidelines,” which are identified by the words, “Should” or “Should Not.”  Per the BBC Mobile Requirements website, “In general, standards are best practices that can easily be tested with specific criteria that is not subjective and is technologically possible to achieve with current assistive technology on mobile devices.  Guidelines are less testable but considered core to accessible mobile website and apps.”

For the most part, the BBC Mobile Requirements reflect existing WCAG 2.0 requirements.  For example, the BBC Mobile Requirements state that mobile application content requiring user input (e.g., forms to sign up for email alerts) should have explicit labels describing the type of user input that is required.  This is similar to WCAG 2.0 Level A Guideline 3.3.2 – Labels or Instructions, requiring that, “Labels or instructions are provided when content requires user input.”  Additionally, in some instances, the BBC Mobile Requirements directly reference the WCAG 2.0.  For example, the BBC Mobile Requirements’ Standard for color contrast states that developers should “… use the WCAG 2.0 Level AA contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1.”  However, there are some BBC Mobile Requirements, such as “Touch target size” (requiring mobile application content to be structured so that it is large enough for a user to tap the target area comfortable with one finger), that do not have an equivalent WCAG 2.0 requirement at this time.

Given the challenges some businesses have cited in directly applying all WCAG 2.0 guidelines to certain aspects of mobile applications, the BBC Mobile Requirements offer another possible consideration.  However, the lack of clarity with respect to this issue only underscores why DOJ’s most recent additional regulatory delay is the sources of considerable frustration for most businesses.

As always, keep following EBG’s blogs for updates regarding ongoing developments in accessible technology.

DOL Releases New Poster and Employer’s Guide to FMLA

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Retailers should note that the Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (“DOL”) has just released a new Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) poster and The Employer’s Guide to The Family and Medical Leave Act (“Guide”).

New FMLA Poster

The FMLA requires covered employers to display a copy of the General FMLA Notice prominently in a conspicuous place. The new poster is more reader-friendly and better organized than the previous one. The font is larger and the poster contains a QR code that will connect the reader directly to the DOL homepage. According to the DOL, however, the February 2013 version of the FMLA poster can continue to be used to fulfill the FMLA’s posting requirement.

The Employer’s Guide to The Family and Medical Leave Act

According to the DOL, the Guide is intended to provide employers with “essential information about the FMLA, including information about employers’ obligations under the law and the options available to employers in administering leave under the FMLA.” The Guide reviews issues in chronological order, beginning with a discussion of whether an employer is covered under the FMLA, all the way through an employee’s return to work after taking FMLA leave. The Guide includes helpful “Did You Know?” sections that shed light on some of the lesser-known provisions of the FMLA. The Guide also includes hyperlinks to the DOL website and visual aids to improve the reader’s experience. Overall the Guide helps navigating the complex FMLA process; however, it does not provide any guidance beyond the existing regulations.

DOJ Launches New Online Resource Regarding Accessible Technology Issues

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While many continue to wait with growing impatience for the U.S. Department of Justice to finally issue regulations governing website accessibility for businesses under Title III of the ADA, DOJ has just launched a new online resource for those interested in staying abreast of developments in the overall area of accessible technology. 

This new site is meant to provide further guidance and information to employers, state/local governments, businesses and non-profits, and individuals with disabilities by serving as a “one stop” source for DOJ’s technical assistance and guidance about accessible technology (e.g., website accessibility, e-readers, point-of-sale devices), as well as providing up to date information about DOJ’s enforcement efforts, regulatory/rulemaking endeavors, and other related initiatives in this sphere. 

We will, of course, also continue to keep you apprised of breaking news in this rapidly developing area of the law. 

 

NLRB Argues “Misclassification” of Independent Contractors Is Unfair Labor Practice

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Our colleague Steven M. Swirsky, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Management Memo blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the retail industry: “NLRB Argues ‘Misclassification’ as an Independent Contractor Is Unfair Labor Practice.”

Following is an excerpt:

In a further incursion into the area of the gig and new age economy, the Regional Director for the National Labor Relations Board’s Los Angeles office has issued an unfair labor practice complaint alleging that it is a violation of the National Labor Relations Act (the “Act”) for an employer to misclassify an employee as an independent contractor. …

The issuance of the complaint in this case comes less than a month after the Board’s General Counsel issued General Counsel Memorandum 16-01, Mandatory Submissions to Advice, identifying the types of cases that reflected “matters that involve General Counsel initiatives and/or priority areas of the law and labor policy.”  Among the top priorities are “Cases involving the employment status of workers in the on-demand economy,” and “Cases involving the question of whether the misclassification of employees as independent contractors,” which as reflected in the IBT complaint the General Counsel contends violates Section 8(a)(1) of the Act.

Read the full post here.

San Francisco and New York State Approve Landmark Legislation on Paid Parental Leave – Employment Law This Week

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The top story on Employment Law This Week – San Francisco and New York state break new ground on paid parental leave.

Starting in 2017, businesses with more than 50 employees in San Francisco will be required to give new parents six weeks off, fully paid. San Francisco is the first city in the U.S. to require full salary for new mothers and fathers during their time off. Meanwhile, New York state has passed the most comprehensive paid parental leave policy in the country. New York state’s legislation mandates 12 weeks of partially paid leave for all new parents by 2021.

View the episode below and learn more about the New York legislation in an EBG Act Now Advisory or the San Francisco legislation in an earlier blog post.

San Francisco Paid Parental Leave

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On April 5, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors unanimously approved a city ordinance requiring businesses which have employees working in the City to offer those employees six weeks of supplemental paid parental leave. If signed by Mayor Ed Lee, San Francisco will be the first city in the country to require this benefit.

Current and Proposed Law

Currently, California employees are eligible to take six weeks of partially-paid leave under California’s Paid Family Leave (PFL) law to bond with a newborn child or newly placed child for adoption or foster care, among other reasons. Payment is made from a worker-funded state disability program and calculated as a percentage of the employee’s wages (55 percent) subject to the maximum weekly benefit amount set by the PFL program.

Under the proposed San Francisco ordinance, for up to six weeks employers must bridge the gap between the amount the employee receives in PFL and one-hundred percent of the employee’s gross weekly wages (referred to as “Supplemental Compensation”) for parental bonding purposes.  In other words, the employer must pay the remaining forty-five percent of the employee’s gross wages. However, if the employee is already receiving the maximum weekly benefit under the PFL law, the employee’s gross weekly wage is calculated by dividing the maximum weekly benefit amount by the percentage rate of wage replacement provided under the PFL.

Covered employers

The ordinance will eventually cover all employers that regularly employ twenty or more individuals if any of those persons are regularly employed in San Francisco. The ordinance will be phased in, starting with companies that employ 50 or more employees in January 2017. Companies with 35 to 49 employees must comply starting in July 2017, and companies with 20 to 34 employees will have until January 2018 to comply.

The ordinance does not apply to federal, state or municipal government entities.

Covered employees

The Supplemental Compensation benefit has four eligibility requirements. It applies to new mothers and fathers who: (1) have been employed at least 90 days prior to starting leave; (2) are eligible to receive PFL compensation from the State of California; (3) perform at least eight hours of work per week for the employer within the city of San Francisco; and (4) at least forty percent of their total weekly hours worked for the employer are within the city of San Francisco. Part-time and temporary employees and employees of staffing agencies are expressly included.

The employee must agree to allow the employer, in its discretion, to apply up to two weeks of the employee’s unused vacation leave to help meet the employer’s obligation to provide Supplemental Compensation. If the covered employee does not agree, the employer is not required to provide Supplemental Compensation.

Anti-Retaliation

The ordinance prohibits covered employers from discriminating or taking, threatening to take, any adverse action against any person in retaliation for exercising rights to Supplemental Compensation. This includes discharging, threatening to discharge, demoting, suspending, filing a complaint with the Office of Labor Standards Enforcement, or cooperating in any prosecution or investigation of an alleged violation of the ordinance. The ordinance imposes a rebuttable presumption of retaliation, shifting the burden of proving non-retaliation to the employer by clear and convincing evidence.

Employee Verification

There are no provisions in the ordinance permitting an employer to require the employee to provide verification of the need for leave.

Termination of Employee on Leave

If an employee is terminated during leave, the employer must continue paying Supplemental Compensation to the employee for the remainder of the California Paid Family Leave period. The ordinance does not contain any exception which creates a very unusual situation where the employer might be required to make payments to an employee terminated for misconduct.

Records  Required

Employers are required to keep records of Supplemental Compensation paid for three years. Although not stated in the ordinance, to comply with the Labor Code, employers should make a notation of any Supplemental Compensation payment on the employee’s paystub.

Further Thoughts

As has been the case with other progressive San Francisco employment-related ordinances, there are many questions to be resolved about how this new law will be applied. We anticipate that the City’s Office of Labor Standards Enforcement will issue some form of guidance for employers in advance of the first effective date of the ordinance. We also anticipate that employers will discover more ambiguities and uncertainties in the ordinance as they more toward developing policies for compliance. We will keep our friends and clients advised as developments warrant. As is always the case with San Francisco employment law, stay tuned!

New Online Resource Can Help Employers Make Their eRecruiting Technologies Accessible to All Job Seekers

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Our colleague Frank C. Morris, Jr., attorney at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Financial Services Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the retail industry: “New Online Recruiting Accessibility Tool Could Help Forestall ADA Claims by Applicants With Disabilities.”

Following is an excerpt:

In recent years, employers have increasingly turned to web based recruiting technologies and online applications. For some potential job applicants, including individuals with disabilities, such as those who are blind or have low vision, online technologies for seeking positions can prove problematic. For example, some recruiting technologies and web-based job applications may not work for individuals with disabilities who use screen readers to access information on the web. The U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) recently announced the launch of “TalentWorks.”

Read the full post here.

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