Our colleague Valerie Butera, a Member of the Firm at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the OSHA Law Update blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the retail industry: “OSHA’s New Electronic Recordkeeping Rule Creates a Number of New Pitfalls for Employers.”

Following is an excerpt:

On May 12, 2016, OSHA published significant amendments to its recordkeeping rule, requiring many employers to submit work-related injury and illness information to the agency electronically.  The amendments also include provisions designed to prevent employers from retaliating against employees for reporting injuries and illnesses at work.  The information employers provide will be “scrubbed” of personally identifiable information and published on OSHA’s website in a searchable format. …

OSHA plans to rely upon computer software to remove personally identifiable information from these records.  The software will supposedly remove all of the fields that contain identifiers such as the employee’s name, address, and work title, and to search the narrative field in the form to ensure that no personally identifiable information is contained in it.  OSHA’s reliance on a computer system to detect every piece of identifiable information in a narrative is terribly risky and increases the potential for a data breach.

Read the full post here.

By Valerie Butera

With the holiday shopping season fast approaching, OSHA has reached out to retailers strongly encouraging them to adopt a set of Crowd Management Safety Guidelines for Retailers, in addition to their existing safety and health policies and procedures.

Citing the tragic death of a retail employee who was crushed during a stampede at a Black Friday event in 2008, OSHA has urged the adoption of these crowd control protocols as a critical step for employers and store owners to take in ensuring employee safety during the holiday shopping rush, and other events where large crowds may gather.  OSHA recently sent letters directly to major retailers, retail trade associations, and fire marshals enclosing its recommended crowd management guidelines and encouraging employers and first responders to establish a plan well ahead of events likely to draw large crowds, such as Black Friday.

Crowd management plans should include, at a minimum:

  • Barricades or rope lines that do not start immediately in front of store entrances to manage pedestrian traffic;
  • Police officers or other trained security or crowd management personnel on site;
  • Communication to shoppers of updated information about the event and the store, such as the location of entrances and exits, store opening and closing times, and the location of hot items within the store;
  • Additional staff sufficient to meet the needs of large crowds of customers;
  • Crowd management training for all employees to ensure that they understand how to manage the event;
  • Prevention of additional shoppers from entering the store when it is at or near its maximum occupancy level;
  • Clear and unobstructed pathways to all exit doors, which should be unlocked;
  • Emergency procedures in place in case a dangerous situation does arise; and
  • Instructions to employees that in the event of an emergency they should follow instructions from first responders regardless of company rules.

If they have not already done so, retailers should begin crowd management planning for Black Friday now.  Reach out to local police and other first responders to inform them if large crowds are expected at your stores on Black Friday and coordinate a response plan in case an emergency takes place.  Taking time to employ these simple measures will go a long way towards ensuring that employees enjoy a safe and healthy holiday season.