U.S. Department of Labor

Retail employers should take note that the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) updated its mandatory posters notifying employees of their rights under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and Employee Polygraph Protection Act (“EPPA”).  The FLSA and EPPA posters no longer identify the civil monetary penalties that may be assessed for violations.  The FLSA poster also provides information regarding the rights of nursing mothers under the FLSA.  Employers are required to post the revised mandatory posters as of August 1, 2016, and may download the revised posters from the DOL’s website.

Employers should review their workplace employment law postings to ensure those displayed are up-to-date and in compliance with all applicable laws.

Employers should also be reminded of their responsibilities under the FLSA, including their responsibilities to nursing mother employees who are subject to the FLSA’s overtime requirements. Those nursing mothers are entitled to reasonable break time to express breast milk for one year after the child’s birth and a private place, other than a bathroom, to do so.

Our colleague Frank C. Morris, Jr., attorney at Epstein Becker Green, has a post on the Financial Services Employment Law blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the retail industry: “New Online Recruiting Accessibility Tool Could Help Forestall ADA Claims by Applicants With Disabilities.”

Following is an excerpt:

In recent years, employers have increasingly turned to web based recruiting technologies and online applications. For some potential job applicants, including individuals with disabilities, such as those who are blind or have low vision, online technologies for seeking positions can prove problematic. For example, some recruiting technologies and web-based job applications may not work for individuals with disabilities who use screen readers to access information on the web. The U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) recently announced the launch of “TalentWorks.”

Read the full post here.

Our colleagues Adam C. Abrahms and Steven M. Swirsky, attorneys at Epstein Becker Green, have a post on the Management Memo blog that will be of interest to many of our readers in the retail industry: “Department of Labor Releases New Persuader Rule Intended to Aid Union Organizing.”

The US Department of Labor has finally issued its long awaited Final Rule radically reinterpreting the “Advice Exemption” to the Labor Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959 (“LMRDA.”).  The Final Rule eviscerates any meaningful use of the Advice Exemption, which would be swallowed up by the new expansive definition of persuader activity which could include discussion regarding strategy, reviews of employer drafts and myriad other ways labor attorneys currently aid their clients including essentially any meaningful advice or counsel provided by labor counsel. The move comes just over two years to the day from the DOL’s 2014 postponement of its issuance of the Final Rule. …

Read the full post here.

 By Anna A. Cohen

In its Agency Rule List for Spring 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed to amend the Regulations implementing the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) by revising the definition of “spouse” in light of the United States Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor, No. 12-307 (U.S. June 26, 2013).   In Windsor, the Supreme Court struck down the provisions of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) that denied federal benefits to legally married, same-sex couples.  The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons. Eligible employees may take FMLA leave, among other reasons, to care for the employee’s spouse who has a serious health condition.

1. Place of Residence Definition

In August 2013, the DOL issued updated FMLA guidance documents as a result of President Obama’s directive to the DOL to coordinate with other federal agencies to implement the Windsor decision.  This initial guidance removed references to DOMA, affirming the availability of spousal leave based on same-sex marriages under the FMLA; however, the DOL only expanded benefits to same-sex married couples residing in states that recognize same-sex marriage.  For example, updated DOL Fact Sheet # 28F: Qualifying Reasons for Leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act defines a “spouse” as “a husband or wife as defined or recognized under state law for purposes of marriage in the state where the employee resides, including ‘common law’ marriage and same-sex marriage.”  This narrow definition of “spouse” is significant to retailers with locations in multiple states since only 19 states, to date, recognize same-sex marriage, whether by court decision, legislation or popular vote.  If the DOL codifies the place of residence definition of “spouse,” retailers with employees in a same-sex marriage who work in a state where their marriage is legally recognized, but live in a state where it is not, would not be entitled to FMLA benefits to care for their spouse. 

2. Place of Celebration Definition

Another option would be for the DOL to broaden the definition of “spouse” to recognize legally married individuals under any state law, regardless of the employee’s residence.  This definition would be consistent with the DOL’s September 2013 Guidance to employee benefit plans, which took a “place of celebration” approach to the definition of “spouse” and “marriage” for purposes of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).  In its ERISA Guidance, the DOL defined the term “spouse” as any “individuals who are lawfully married under any state law, including individuals married to a person of the same sex who were legally married in a state that recognizes such marriages, but who are domiciled in a state that does not recognize such marriages.”  If the DOL were to adopt the broad place of celebration definition of “spouse” contained in its ERISA Guidance when it amends the FMLA Regulations, FMLA benefits would be available to all legally married spouses, regardless of the definition of “marriage” in the state where the employee lives or where the employer operates.  Accordingly, employers would look to the place of celebration to determine whether employees are entitled to spousal benefits under the FMLA.  For example, retailers with employees who legally enter into a same-sex marriage in the Northeast would be considered legally married for purposes of the FMLA in all of the retailer’s locations, even if they subsequently live or work in a state which does not recognize that marriage.  

Regardless of the definition adopted by the DOL, employers in all states must be alert to this impending change.  Once the FMLA Regulations are amended, employers should review all FMLA-related policies, procedures, forms and notices.  Employers should also be aware of their obligations under state and local leave laws that may provide greater leave rights than the FMLA, such as leave to care for same-sex partners in civil unions or domestic partnerships. We will continue to monitor the DOL’s position on same sex marriage as it affects the FMLA and other laws and regulations.

We recommend this recent client alert on Epstein Becker Green’s website: “Special Immigration Alert: The Immigration Ripple Effect of a Government Shutdown,” by Robert Groban, Jr., Pierre Georges Bonnefil, Patrick Brady, Jang Im, and Greta Ravitsky, our colleagues at Epstein Becker Green.

Following is an excerpt:

The looming prospect of a Government shutdown will have a significant impact on the immigration process. Activities of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be largely unaffected because it is funded by the fees it collects. The shutdown, however, may affect the ability of applicants to secure the government information required to respond to Requests for Evidence.

Read the full client alert here.

Epstein Becker Green is pleased to announce the availability of a Wage and Hour Division Investigation Checklist, which provides retail employers with valuable information about wage and hour investigations and audits conducted by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). Like EBG’s first-of-its kind Wage and Hour App, which provides detailed information about federal and state laws, the Checklist is a free resource offered by EBG.

The Checklist provides step-by-step guidance on the following issues: preparation before a Wage and Hour Division investigation of the DOL; preliminary investigation issues; document production; on-site inspection activities; employee interviews; and back-wage findings, and post-audit considerations.

“The multitude of wage and hour claims and lawsuits that workers have filed under the Fair Labor Standards Act and its state law counterparts have made wage and hour law the nation’s fastest growing type of litigation. And federal and state agencies are investigating and pursuing wage and hour claims more aggressively than ever,” said Michael Kun, the national Co-Chairperson of the firm’s Wage and Hour, Individual and Collective Actions practice group. “We hope that our Checklist will serve as an important resource for retail employers to use when confronted with an audit – and perhaps help them avoid an audit altogether.”

Click Here to Download EBG’s Wage and Hour Division Investigation Checklist