National Grocers Association

For 2 days, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) heard from speakers on its proposed rules to accelerate the processing of union representation petitions and quicken the timing of elections. The speakers ranged from several labor unions, including the UFCW, SEIU, CWA and AFL-CIO as well as a number of trade associations, including National Federation of Independent Businesses, Coalition for a Democratic Workplace, National Association of Manufacturers, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and EBG client, National Grocers Association (NGA). The positions of the parties were largely split between the labor unions applauding the NLRB’s proposed rule on making elections faster; whereas, the trade associations and management attorneys emphasizing that the NLRB’s proposed rule was unnecessary and a solution in search of a problem.

EBG attorney, Kara M. Maciel, represented the voice of NGA on three separate panels. First, she argued that the NLRB’s proposed rule requiring employers – for the first time – to submit a written position statement within 7 days of the union’s petition setting forth the employer’s entire legal argument, or risk waiver later, is unduly burdensome and risks that the process leading to a pre-election hearing will become more adversarial and less focused on reaching a negotiated pre-election stipulation. Under current procedures, over 90% of petitions are stipulated to without a pre-election hearing, but under the NLRB’s proposed rule, employers could feel pressured to go to a hearing in light of the written position statement requirement.

Second, Maciel testified that the election date should not be accelerated from the current 34 day median to 10-21 days contemplated by the rule. “Hasty decisions are not good decisions” and she noted that “common sense dictates that the greater the time an individual has to inform himself, and to reflect upon and consider all aspects of a decision, the more likely the decision will be a true reflection of the individual’s interests.” NGA is concerned about the due process rights impairing an employer’s protected 8(c) rights under the National Labor Relations Act if there is not sufficient time to communicate with employees about a union petition for representation.

Finally, Maciel expressed concern over the proposed rules compulsory disclosure of employee’s personal and confidential e-mail accounts and phone numbers on voter lists. The non-consensual disclosure constitutes a gross invasion of employees’ privacy and opens employees up to potential use and abuse of their personal information.

The NLRB will now consider all the written and oral comments submitted by the public on the proposed rules; however, it is widely expected that the NLRB will adopt the rules as proposed. Following the rule-making process, it is likely that trade associations could seek to enjoin implementation of the rule through a court challenge. In the meantime, all employers should brace themselves for the rule and implement training and education for their management team on how to respond to union organizing.

For more information on NLRB’s two-day public meeting, please click here.

Our colleague Kara Maciel will speak on behalf of EBG client, National Grocers Association (“NGA”), at the National Labor Relations Board’s public meeting, scheduled for April 10-11, 2014 regarding the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”) on the “ambush election” representation procedures.

The panels will address the following topics:

  • Panel B.2: Requirement for written statement of position
    Address issues related to the proposed requirement for a written statement of position.
  • Panel E.1 & E.3: Election date
    Please describe the standard to be applied for scheduling an election. The proposed rules state that the regional director should select an election date which is “as soon as practicable.” If you disagree with this standard, please describe the standard you would apply. Specify whether you think the rules should include a minimum or maximum time between the filing of the petition and the election, and, if so, how long this time should be. Also address whether the proposed rules adequately protect free speech interests; if you believe they do not, please state specifically how the proposal can be adapted to adequately address the matter.
  • Panel C: Voter lists
    Address whether or how the rules should address voter lists.

During the open meeting, April 10 and 11, catch the live stream at