Massachusetts Paid Sick Leave

On May 1, 2015, we reported on proposed regulations to the Massachusetts paid sick leave law, which becomes effective on July 1, 2015.  The regulations have not yet been adopted, and in light of the uncertainty about many provisions of the law, the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office has issued a “Safe Harbor for Employers with Existing Paid Time Off Policies.”  Under the safe harbor, any employer with a paid time off policy in existence as of May 1, 2015, which provides employees with the right to use at least 30 hours of paid time off per year, will be deemed in compliance with the new sick leave law.  The safe harbor will expire on December 31 of this year, and as of January 1, 2016, all covered employers will be required to comply with the provisions of the new law. Our November 10, 2014 Advisory summarizes the law’s provisions and requirements.

The proposed regulations to the paid sick leave law, which would clarify employer obligations under law, remain under review by the Massachusetts Attorney General and during the comment period have been subject to considerable objection.  For this reason, and because the law carries the potential for substantial penalties for non-compliance, several employers and professional organizations have urged postponement of the law’s effective date.  Notwithstanding these objections, the law’s effective date remains July 1, 2015 and employers should prepare to comply.

The AGO has also published the earned sick time notice on its website.

As we reported, last November, voters in Massachusetts approved a law granting Massachusetts employees the right to sick leave, starting on July 1, 2015.  The law provides paid sick leave for employers with 11 or more employees and unpaid sick leave for employees with 10 or fewer employees. While the law set forth the basics, many of the details, which have differentiated the various sick leave laws across the country, were not previously specified (e.g., minimum increments of use, frontloading, documentation).  The Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office (“AGO”) has set forth proposed regulations to guide employers in implementing the upcoming sick leave law.

Some of the proposed regulations include:

  • To determine an employer’s size, the number of employees at all locations will be counted, not just those employees in Massachusetts. For example, if a company has 25 employees in New York and three employees in Massachusetts, the employer will be required to provide paid sick leave to the Massachusetts employees because the employer has 11 or more employees in total.
  • Employees may use sick leave in hourly increments. However, if the employer has to hire a replacement, and does so, the employer may charge the employee for the entire missed shift.
  • If an employer decides to pay employees for their accrued, unused sick leave at the end of the calendar year, the employer need only frontload 16 hours in the following calendar year (as opposed to all 40 hours the employee will receive that year).[1]
  • An employer may choose to frontload 40 hours of sick leave per year rather than tracking accrual rates throughout the year.
  • An employer may not request documentation about an employee’s need for leave until the employee has taken 24 consecutive hours of sick leave.
    • At that point, an employee may provide documentation in the form of a doctor’s note or a written statement evidencing the need to use sick leave.[2]
    • If leave is related to domestic violence, an employee may provide alternative documentation.
    • The employee may submit any of the above documentation in any form customarily used to communicate, including via text message, e-mail, or fax.
  • Employers must provide written notice to employees at the beginning of employment as to what constitutes a “calendar year” for accrual and use purposes.
  • Employers must post the notice of the Earned Sick Time Law in the workplace and provide a copy to all employees.

The AGO will be holding six public hearings throughout the state, including one in Boston on May 18, 2015, to entertain comments to the proposed regulations. The deadline for written comments, which may be submitted by mail or electronically, is June 10.  If you would like assistance in preparing any comments, please contact us. We will provide an update upon adoption of the regulations (whether in this form, or revised after the comment period).

[1] This is more employer-friendly than the New York City Earned Sick Time Act, which requires that 40 hours be frontloaded if an employer pays out sick leave at the end of the calendar year.

[2] The AGO will create a model form for this use, but such form has not been posted yet.