Fair Labor Standards Act

Our colleague at Epstein Becker Green has a post on the Wage and Hour Defense blog that will be of interest to our readers in the retail industry: “Federal Court Concludes That 7-Eleven Franchisees Are Not Employees of 7-Eleven.

Following is an excerpt:

In November 2017, four convenience store franchisees brought suit in federal court against 7-Eleven, Inc., alleging that they and all other franchisees were employees of 7-Eleven. The case was filed in the United States District Court for the Central District of California, entitled Haitayan, et al. v. 7-Eleven, Inc., case no. CV 17-7454-JFW (JPRx).

In alleging that they were 7-Eleven’s employees, the franchisees brought claims for violation of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and the California Labor Code, alleging overtime and expense reimbursement violations. The trial court granted judgment in 7-Eleven’s favor, concluding that 7-Eleven was not the four franchisees’ employer under California law or federal law. …

Read the full post here.

Retail employers should take note that the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) updated its mandatory posters notifying employees of their rights under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and Employee Polygraph Protection Act (“EPPA”).  The FLSA and EPPA posters no longer identify the civil monetary penalties that may be assessed for violations.  The FLSA poster also provides information regarding the rights of nursing mothers under the FLSA.  Employers are required to post the revised mandatory posters as of August 1, 2016, and may download the revised posters from the DOL’s website.

Employers should review their workplace employment law postings to ensure those displayed are up-to-date and in compliance with all applicable laws.

Employers should also be reminded of their responsibilities under the FLSA, including their responsibilities to nursing mother employees who are subject to the FLSA’s overtime requirements. Those nursing mothers are entitled to reasonable break time to express breast milk for one year after the child’s birth and a private place, other than a bathroom, to do so.

By: Jeffrey M. Landes and Susan Gross Sholinsky

The presentation slides and the recording for the webinar – Creating and Maintaining a Lawful Internship Program – are now accessible for your viewing.  If you would like to review, please contact Kiirsten Lederer to obtain instructions. 

During this timely and important webinar, we discussed how to minimize both your organization’s liability and the risk of wage and hour lawsuits. Specifically, participants walked away with answers to the following questions:

  • What are the best practices for recruiting and hiring interns, and what critical language should you include (or avoid) in offer letters, employment contracts, and other communications?
  • What assignments are appropriate for interns, and what tasks must you prevent interns from doing?
  • How does the Fair Labor Standards Act apply to interns?
  • What is the best way to handle various forms of remuneration (money, academic credit, company discounts, etc.) for interns?
  • How do the rules of for-profit and non-profit companies differ (and what rules apply to public-sector employers)?
  • How do child labor laws affect internships?
  • What are best practices for organizations—before, during and after an internship program?
  • Do company policies apply to interns?
  • What rules should you consider if you would like to hire an intern on a full-time basis in the future?
  • When does workers’ compensation or other insurance kick in, and how should you handle unemployment insurance?
  • What common blunders should you avoid when setting up school internship programs?
  • What ethical considerations apply when creating an internship program?

We look forward to your participation in future EBG educational programs.  Please click here for a list of upcoming webinars/events that may be of interest to you or your colleagues.

 

 

Epstein Becker Green is pleased to announce the availability of a Wage and Hour Division Investigation Checklist, which provides retail employers with valuable information about wage and hour investigations and audits conducted by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL). Like EBG’s first-of-its kind Wage and Hour App, which provides detailed information about federal and state laws, the Checklist is a free resource offered by EBG.

The Checklist provides step-by-step guidance on the following issues: preparation before a Wage and Hour Division investigation of the DOL; preliminary investigation issues; document production; on-site inspection activities; employee interviews; and back-wage findings, and post-audit considerations.

“The multitude of wage and hour claims and lawsuits that workers have filed under the Fair Labor Standards Act and its state law counterparts have made wage and hour law the nation’s fastest growing type of litigation. And federal and state agencies are investigating and pursuing wage and hour claims more aggressively than ever,” said Michael Kun, the national Co-Chairperson of the firm’s Wage and Hour, Individual and Collective Actions practice group. “We hope that our Checklist will serve as an important resource for retail employers to use when confronted with an audit – and perhaps help them avoid an audit altogether.”

Click Here to Download EBG’s Wage and Hour Division Investigation Checklist