On March 13, 2014 President Obama issued a memorandum instructing the Department of Labor (“DOL”) to review and revise overtime regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). Under the FLSA employees are eligible to receive overtime for all hours worked over 40 per week, unless they fall within certain specified exemptions. The most common of exempt classifications in the retail industry are executive, administrative, and commission sales.
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By Jennifer Nutter and Amy Messigian

’Twas the night before the holiday party and all through the halls,
Human Resources was stirring, and posting on walls!
The policies were hung on the blackboard with care with the knowledge that 2014 soon would be there!

Like a holiday carol sung every December, a tune repeats this

Our colleagues Kara Maciel and Adam Solander have a new Law360 article, “Where ERISA and the Affordable Care Act Collide,” that serves as an important wake-up call on staffing decisions that employers have to face.

Following is an excerpt:

In July 2013, the Obama administration announced a delay of the employer mandate provision

By Lisa M. Watanabe

On September 12, 2013, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) issued a bulletin warning employers that they cannot require their employees to receive wages on payroll cards. The CFPB’s bulletin was issued amid the growing unrest among workers about the high and unexpected fees often associated with payroll cards.  Critics say

In this month’s Take 5 newsletter, I discuss how California is unique for making numerous types of protected leaves of absence available to employees.  All of these options can add up to a lot of protected leave.

Following is from the introduction:

National employers often find it challenging to navigate the employment laws of

By Jennifer Nutter

Until recently, California retail employers could leverage the threat that employees suing them for nonpayment of wages (including sales commissions), fringe benefits, or health and welfare or pension fund contributions would have to pay the employer’s attorneys’ fees in the event that the claim was unsuccessful.  Labor Code Section 218.5 provided that

by Lisa M. Watanabe

In recent years, retailers, grocery stores and banks have been hit with a wave of lawsuits over California’s suitable seating requirements set forth in §14 of the Industrial Welfare Commission’s Wage Orders.  (See http://www.dir.ca.gov/iwc/wageorderindustries.htm for § 14 in 16 of the 17 industry-specific Wage Orders).  Despite the surge in lawsuits, there